tfl

Zero Star Rating from TFL: What’s Next for Uber?

At The Value Engineers we like to think about Shockwaves; imaginary, yet plausible future scenarios that would have dramatic implications for businesses. This challenges brands to think critically about their current strategy and direction. The most destructive Shockwaves tend to be the ones that prevent a brand from doing business at all. But of course that rarely happens in real life.
It seems though, that sometimes life can throw up shockwaves of its own…

A few weeks ago Uber’s application for a new licence to operate in London has been rejected on the basis that the company is not “a fit and proper” operator. This means that, after a 21 day period, Uber could in theory not be allowed to operate in London at all. Specific details on this are currently unclear, although it seems their supposedly relaxed approach to passenger safety and driver vetting may be driving the decision by TFL.

It will be interesting to see how this story will evolve:

Will consumers revolt, and urge Uber to challenge the ruling as they shudder at the prospect of travelling only via the Night Tube, buses and regular black cabs?
Will new competitors sense the opportunity to move in and disrupt the world’s biggest disruptor with a better (and regulatory sound) product? Could Lyft seize this opportunity to enter the UK market with a more ethical approach?

What impact will this have on the Uber brand, already on the ropes following several internal crises?

Regardless, with Uber integrated into the lives of so many Londoners, the question on everyone’s mind must surely be this: what on earth are we all going to do that first Saturday night without Uber?

Answer: probably get the bus.

Originally posted on The Value Engineers’ blog.

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WOULD YOU MIND THE GAP, APPLE AND NIKE TAKING OVER TUBE STOPS?

On hearing the news that TFL may sell off the names of some stations to corporations, I wondered what a tube map covered in brands would look like. I’ve put together this tube map (positioning as far as possible brands which seem appropriate to the locations they would be taking over!) and would love to hear your thoughts on whether you think I’ve got it right. Is Burberry an appropriate sponsor for Knightsbridge? Is Google the Euston of brands?

 

            Brand-map-1024x579

 

 

And what kind of tube experience would you expect from Harley Davidson? Jack Daniels? Samsung? Would you prefer having a station sponsored by Aston Martin on your doorstep or one by Marks & Spencer?

(Originally posted on The Value Engineers blog on November 19th 2013)