cab

Zero Star Rating from TFL: What’s Next for Uber?

At The Value Engineers we like to think about Shockwaves; imaginary, yet plausible future scenarios that would have dramatic implications for businesses. This challenges brands to think critically about their current strategy and direction. The most destructive Shockwaves tend to be the ones that prevent a brand from doing business at all. But of course that rarely happens in real life.
It seems though, that sometimes life can throw up shockwaves of its own…

A few weeks ago Uber’s application for a new licence to operate in London has been rejected on the basis that the company is not “a fit and proper” operator. This means that, after a 21 day period, Uber could in theory not be allowed to operate in London at all. Specific details on this are currently unclear, although it seems their supposedly relaxed approach to passenger safety and driver vetting may be driving the decision by TFL.

It will be interesting to see how this story will evolve:

Will consumers revolt, and urge Uber to challenge the ruling as they shudder at the prospect of travelling only via the Night Tube, buses and regular black cabs?
Will new competitors sense the opportunity to move in and disrupt the world’s biggest disruptor with a better (and regulatory sound) product? Could Lyft seize this opportunity to enter the UK market with a more ethical approach?

What impact will this have on the Uber brand, already on the ropes following several internal crises?

Regardless, with Uber integrated into the lives of so many Londoners, the question on everyone’s mind must surely be this: what on earth are we all going to do that first Saturday night without Uber?

Answer: probably get the bus.

Originally posted on The Value Engineers’ blog.

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cairo, uber, business, travel, traveller

Uber: the business traveller’s safety blanket

Travelling through an unfamiliar country on business is a tiring and bewildering affair.

One of the first, and arguably most frustrating, situations happens immediately after you land. Stumbling out of the arrivals hall, with little idea what time of day or night it is, not least where on earth your hotel is, it is tempting to collapse into the nearest cab.

And I did exactly that a few days ago, stepping out into Cairo where I was greeted with a scrum of taxi drivers. The most persistent ended up charging me about £20 for what turned out to be a relatively short journey. I was, however, grateful and was duly whisked away to my hotel. It was only when I met a colleague in Egypt did I realise that Uber was flourishing and I should use it instead. No cash, no haggling on price, and a reliably efficient route. Exactly the same journey in reverse? The equivalent of £2.

So I left Egypt with a bruised ego and a renewed love for Uber.

The system works. Excellent.